Curriculum Overview

In Year 6, children learn about a variety of different mathematical concepts. Below are the topics covered this year.

Year 6 Statutory Requirements

NUMBER – NUMBER & PLACE VALUE
  • Read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10 000 000 and determine the value of each digit
  • Round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy
  • Use negative numbers in context, and calculate intervals across zero
  • Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above.
NUMBER – ADDITION, SUBTRACTION, MULTIPLICATION & DIVISION
  • Multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long multiplication
  • Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding, as appropriate for the context
  • Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit number using the formal written method of short division where appropriate, interpreting remainders according to the context
  • Perform mental calculations, including with mixed operations and large numbers
  • Identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers
  • Use their knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations involving the four operations
  • Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why
  • Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • Use estimation to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy.
NUMBER – FRACTIONS (including decimals and percentages)
  • Use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination
  • Compare and order fractions, including fractions > 1
  • Add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions
  • Multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form [for example, ¼ X ½ = 1/8
  • Divide proper fractions by whole numbers [for example, 1/3 ÷ 2 = 1/6
  • Associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents [for example, 0.375] for a simple fraction [for example, 3/8]
  • Identify the value of each digit in numbers given to three decimal places and multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 giving answers up to three decimal places
  • Multiply one-digit numbers with up to two decimal places by whole numbers
  • Use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to two decimal places
  • Solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy
  • Recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts.
RATION & PROPORTION
  • Solve problems involving the relative sizes of two quantities where missing values can be found by using integer multiplication and division facts
  • Solve problems involving the calculation of percentages [for example, of measures, and such as 15% of 360] and the use of percentages for comparison
  • Solve problems involving similar shapes where the scale factor is known or can be found
  • Solve problems involving unequal sharing and grouping using knowledge of fractions and multiples.
ALGEBRA
  • Use simple formulae
  • Generate and describe linear number sequences
  • Express missing number problems algebraically
  • Find pairs of numbers that satisfy an equation with two unknowns
  • Enumerate possibilities of combinations of two variables.
MEASUREMENT
  • Solve problems involving the calculation and conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation up to three decimal places where appropriate
  • Use, read, write and convert between standard units, converting measurements of length, mass, volume and time from a smaller unit of measure to a larger unit, and vice versa, using decimal notation to up to three decimal places
  • Convert between miles and kilometres
  • Recognise that shapes with the same areas can have different perimeters and vice versa
  • Recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area and volume of shapes § calculate the area of parallelograms and triangles
  • Calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units, including cubic centimetres (cm3) and cubic metres (m3), and extending to other units [for example, mm3 and km3].
GEOMETRY – PROPERTIES OF SHAPE
  • Draw 2-D shapes using given dimensions and angles
  • Recognise, describe and build simple 3-D shapes, including making nets
  • Compare and classify geometric shapes based on their properties and sizes and find unknown angles in any triangles, quadrilaterals, and regular polygons
  • Illustrate and name parts of circles, including radius, diameter and circumference and know that the diameter is twice the radius
  • Recognise angles where they meet at a point, are on a straight line, or are vertically opposite, and find missing angles.
GEOMETRY – POSITION & DIRECTION
  • Describe positions on the full coordinate grid (all four quadrants)
  • Draw and translate simple shapes on the coordinate plane, and reflect them in the axes.
STATISTICS
  • Interpret and construct pie charts and line graphs and use these to solve problems
  • Calculate and interpret the mean as an average.

White Rose

As an academy we structure the delivery of the national curriculum in the order set out by the White Rose and we use a great many of their resources such as the ‘small steps’ to support this delivery. The timetable shows the order in which units of work are taught. Please click here.

Marvellous Multiplications

The Marvellous Multiplication system is a structured system that we use at Sneyd Academy to support children in learning multiplication tables by heart. The system uses a variety of active teaching techniques alongside regular opportunities to rehearse multiplication tables so children become familiar with all multiplication and division facts for each multiplication table. By the end of Year 6 children are expected to know the multiplication and division facts for the 10, 5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 7, 9, 11 and 12 times tables by heart. They should recall these facts confidently and quickly and be able to use them to work out answers to more challenging questions such as 7 x 120 or 0.7 x 12.

Example test:

1) 21÷3 = ?
2) How many 3’s in 36 = ?
3) 12 divided by 3 = ?
4) 15÷3 = ?
5)3÷3 = ?
6) 27 divided by 3 = ?
7) 6÷3 = ?
8) How many 3’s in 18 = ?
9) 30÷3 = ?
10) 9 divided by 3 = ?
11) How many 3’s in 33 = ?
12)24÷3 = ?

Reading into Writing Journey

The curriculum is planned in such a way that the children are immersed into the whole class text through a range of reading strategies, such as role play, graphic organisers, role on the wall and character analysis. The children are taught to understand the text they are reading through VIPERS where they are exposed to a range of reading skills. Examples of these questions can be found here.

 

VIPERS skills include:

VOCABULARY

INFER

PREDICT

EXPLAIN

RETRIEVE

SUMMARISE

 

Grammar

Grammar is a major aspect of the school curriculum. Children need to be able to show understanding of different grammatical terms and be able to use them in their writing.

 

Y5 children are assessed on their knowledge of these grammar terms through termly SPAG Tests (Spellings, Punctuation and Grammar). We have designed a Jargon Buster specifically for the key themes within Y5. Click here.

 

Super Sentences

Super sentences are used in each year group and have been designed to encourage and help the children use a range of skills within their writing.

Below is a list of the super sentences taught in Year 5:

Super Sentence Explanation Example
Expanded Noun Phrases Using an adjective before and after a noun. The snarling dragon, with mighty wings, shot out from the cave into the cold air.
Relative Clauses Using whowhichwherewhenwhose and that to add additional information, in between commas. The injured policeman, who was bleeding badly, staggered to the van.
Parenthesis

 

Using commas, brackets and dashes to show extra information. The pyramids, of Ancient Egypt, are enormous.

The pyramids (of Ancient Egypt) are enormous.

The pyramids – of Ancient Egypt – are enormous.

Word of the Day

Each day, a new word is chosen to be The Word of the Day. This could be related to the topic or book that the class are learning about or could be an interesting word that the teacher feels would be useful or fun. The word is then displayed in the classroom for the rest of the year for the children to use in their speaking and listening and, in turn, their written work. Teachers encourage the children to use these words in their writing – and reward them when they do – as it helps to extend their vocabulary.

 

 

Spellings

At Sneyd Academy, we teach the No Nonsense Spelling Scheme and cover the Curriculum Must Know words lists.

 

Each child is given a My Must Know Word list with all the words for their year group. The children are tested on these throughout the year and they are crossed off the list when they can spell them confidently. These words are taught as part of spelling lessons and during afternoon registration work. To see the keywords for Year 3, Year 4, Year 5 and Year 6 please click here.